How Can we Make Failure Productive & Avoid Unproductive Success in Learning Design?

Many times, learning professionals and stakeholders tend to rely on common practices or fads rather than evidence in their design approach. One of these design approaches is providing content and then adding quizzes at the end with a pass or fail outcome. Read More…

How Can We Motivate Employees to Learn?

How can an organization motivate its staff to learn and improve their performance? This has always been a question during my career as a learning professional. Read More…

The Impact of Guided Discovery vs. Didactic Instruction on Learning

Initially posted in www.learningscientists.org

Previous research has identified didactic instruction an effective approach for learners who lack prior knowledge. The evidence suggests that the degree of guidance should vary with the age of learners. Direct instruction can be more beneficial for younger learners (e.g., elementary and middle school children), whereas older ones gain more with non-directive guidance or guided discovery [1]. Different research findings indicate that guided discovery is more effective than lecture-based instruction in that learners develop a deeper understanding of concepts and their underlying structure.
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Cognitive Load, Element Interactivity, & Reversal Effect

Initially posted in www.elearningindustry.com

As learning designers, you have certainly heard of cognitive load theory and it has helped you make informed design decisions. According to cognitive load theory, working memory should not be overloaded in that it disrupts learning, because that is where learning is being processed. Before introducing other elements related to cognitive load, let’s reiterate the forms of cognitive load:
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Universal Design for Learning is Not Learning Styles

Recently, I had a conversation at a conference with an educator, who claimed universal design for learning is learning styles, so we should use learning styles in instruction or training.
No, they are not the same. Read More…